Monday, January 20, 2014

I Have a Dream. By Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. Day


Short Version of I Have A Dream Speech ► Go to Full Version

I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize a shameful condition ... ► Read the full original post in Adventist Repot



Source full text to the "I Have A Dream" speech: Huffington Post
Author: Martin Luther King, Jr. (1929 –1968) was an American clergyman, activist, and leader in the African-American Civil Rights Movement. He is best known for his role in the advancement of civil rights using nonviolent civil disobedience. King has become a national icon in the history of American progressivism.
On October 14, 1964, King received the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolence.
King was assassinated on April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tennessee. His death was followed by riots in many US cities ... King was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977 and Congressional Gold Medal in 2004; Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was established as a U.S. federal holiday in 1986. Hundreds of streets in the U.S. have been renamed in his honor. A memorial statue in Washington, D.C. was opened to the public in 2011 ... ► Read the full original post in Adventist Repot


 

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